Growing Vegetables in Shade – a list of shady plants

Did you know? Green leafy veg that is grown in shade, is less bitter.

Does your garden site receive as few as two hours of direct sunlight a day or only get dappled sunlight? Growing vegetables in shade is possible! – but make sure you select plants that will tolerate and grow in these conditions. You can not force or convince a fruit bearing vegetable like tomatoes, to thrive in shade.

Partially shaded: A garden that has light shade or dappled shade all day, or gardens that receive 2 – 6 hours of direct sun per day, either in the morning or the afternoon with light or full shade otherwise.

Lightly shaded gardens receive a few hours of sun plus plenty of indirect or reflected light for many hours each day.

Deep shade refers to almost no sunlight at all. Only root crops will tolerate these growing conditions.

Growing vegetables in shade will be successful with these vegetables that will grow in partial shade:

  • Beets (will tolerate a lot of shade)
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Carrots (will tolerate a lot of shade)
  • Cauliflower
  • Celery
  • Chard
  • Chinese Cabbage
  • Endive Greens
  • Garlic
  • Horseradish
  • Kale
  • Kohlrabi
  • Lettuce
  • Leeks
  • Parsnips
  • Peas
  • Potatoes (will tolerate a lot of shade)
  • Radishes
  • Sorrel
  • Spinach
  • Summer Squash
  • Turnips
  • Watercress

Examples of herbs that will grow in partial shade include:

  • Angelica
  • Basil
  • Catnip
  • Chives
  • Garden Cress
  • Horseradish
  • Lemon Balm
  • Loveage
  • Mint
  • Parlsey
  • Rosemary
  • Sweet Flag
  • Valerian
  • Woodruff

Keep in mind:

  • Growing vegetables in shade means maturing will take longer.
  • Planting near walls will reflect more light on your plants.
  • Planting in containers will allow you to move your plants around as needs arise.
  • Yields will be smaller when griwing vegetables in shade.
  • Seed germination will be more successful if done indoors.
Just over 4 minutes of great advice!

Plants that are Companions thrive together

Smart, not hard

What you plant now, you will harvest later. Much like people, plants that are companions thrive together. Bad companionship will be inhibiting. Photo by Markus Winkler on Unsplash

The benefits of the right matches made in the plant kingdom are endless if you are looking for a healthy pollination system and pest control. Plants that are companions thrive. The reasons are often incredibly simpleand our micro-managing pests and feeding is usually uunnecessary. Marigolds are everyone’s friend and favorite as a popular pest-control and pollinator-attractive cover crop

Below are easy-to-include suggestions for the general veggie grower. It is by no means conclusive, but a start-here list. Please comment your own tips below this piece for us to also learn through your experiences!

Asparagus – After harvested asparagus hills can be planted with tomatoes and/or parsley on both sides.

Beans – Beans (as all legumes) love being near a grain as they exchange nitrogen with carbon and both plants will thrive. Additionally, they make best friends with carrots, beets and cauliflowers cucumbers and cabbage. Keep away from gladiolas.

Beets – Beets love corn, onions and kohlrabi, beans and ornamental garlic or even lettuce and brassicas.

Cabbage – Cabbage, kohlrabi, spinach and broccoli, brussels sprouts and kale, collards and turnips love being neighbours – especially when planted near aromatic dill,chamomile, sage or celery, peppermint or rosemary. Avoid beans, strawberries and tomatoes.

Carrots – Carrots benefit from being planted near sage, wormwood and rosemary as they repel carrot fly and also loves being near onions and leeks.

Corn – Sweet corn thrives near peas and beans, potatoes and cucumbers, pumpkin, and squash. Cucumber, melons, squash and
pumpkin like the shade provided by corn and peas and beans can use the corn to climb into.

Cucumbers – Cucumbers can be grown near nasturtiums, corn and radishes, but not near aromatic herbs or potatoes.

Lettuce – Lettuce thrive near carrots and strawberries, cucumbers, radishes and lettuce.

Onion – Onions love all members of the cabbage family, beets and tomatoes, strawberries and chamomile. They do not get on with peas and beans.

Sweet Pepper – Sweet Pepper and basil are a good match.

Squash – Squash get on well with radishes and nasturtiums (a good idea is to plant them in each hill for pest control)

Tomato – Tomatoes love cabbage and chives, onion, parsley, marigold, nasturtium and carrot. Garlic planted between
tomato plants protects them from red spider mites and don’t want to be near potatoes and fennel.

Next I’m going to talk about pest control, the natural way.
Please add to our knowledge. My truth + yours = the actual truth. Comment below with your experiences and what you have learned so that we can gain from each other.